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Archive for the ‘Presentations’ Category

Slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) are listed as vulnerable or endangered (IUCN Red List) endemic primate species in Indonesia, heavily hunted for the pet trade. During a six-months-period of medical assistance at IAR Ciapus primate center – West Java, a series of Slow Loris uncommon pathologies were reported.

(the following is the ppt. presentation we gave at the International Conference of Diseases of Zoo and Wild Animals, 8-11 May, Vienna- Austria )

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The slow loris is a small primitive nocturnal primate, the only “poisonous” primate which can excrete a toxin underneath its armpit, “deliver” it with the bite which may lead to anaphylactic shock.
When sold as pets in order to reduce the risk of bites , it is a comune practice for people to cut their sharp teeth.
The species is under serious threat of extinction as a result of habitat loss, illegal trade for pets and for traditional medicine. Because of its “cute” appearance, the illegal wildlife trade is believed to be an even bigger threat to the slow loris’s survival than habitat loss.
The Javan slow loris is included in the category of ‘endangered’ species on the IUCN Red List and named as one of the 25 most endangered primates in the world.

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The NGO : International Animal Rescue has established a facility specializing in the care of slow lorises in Ciapus, West Java, Indonesia.
The team here focuses on the rehabilitation and release of the slow loris , long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques. Is the only rehab station of its kind in Indonesia. It shelters around 100 rescued slow lorises.
The centre has a fully equipped veterinary clinic, quarantine enclosures, primate socialization enclosures and a public education centre.

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This is an article on feral horse remote chemical immobilization  submitted and accepted for poster presentation at the  International  Conference on Diseases of Zoo and Wild Animals, 16th-19th May 2012, Bussolengo/Verona, Italy.

You can download full article here: Alternative chemical immobilization protocol in a group of captive feral horses using homemade remote delivery

Summary
During a 6 months period, we managed to safely perform 102 remote chemical immobilisations on a group of 50 recently captured feral horses. For all procedures a standard combination of 25 mg detomidine, 62.5 mg tiletamine, 62.5 mg zolazepam and 10 mg butorphanol per delivered dart was used and repeated when necessary. We used 3.5 ml handmade darts delivered by an 11 mm wide improvised blowpipe. For better darting and anaesthesia induction results an additional smaller no-eye contact enclosure, was built which reduced the stress of the immobilisation procedures. Bigger and highly temperamental horses needed more than one dart to get recumbent. In most cases (78.4%) the horses had a smooth induction and awakening. The 19.6% rougher awakenings were attributed to longer anaesthesia onset and duration or to the individual horses temperament.

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This presentation is ment to focus on ovarian and uterine cystic disorders in general and only as clinical example the case of our Dutch-born “Kirkegaard” is given.  It was actually a part of the Pathology class in the Small Animals  Module in Vienna, but I thought blending wildlife into small animal practice won’t do any harm. For the ovarian cysts there is the typical example of guinea pigs, but concerning cystic conditions of the uterus the dog is probably the best documented species. The full paper and poster on the two nutrias will soon follow!

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Some of the particularities of a very special species. It was ment as a presentation for the Pathology class in the Conservation Medicine Module.

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This is one of the presentations I prepared for Prof. Schwarzenberger’s course “Conservation Genetics”. It basically summarizes some of the reference papers on a certain topic. In this case: molecular identification techniques, problems and advantages in marine mammals, and specifically Minke whales.

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After visiting the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC), Europe’s largest primate research centre, I chose primate husbandry as topic for a short presentation during the Conservation Module lectures.

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1. Introduction

  • Population density is controlled by natality (+potential reproductive output), mortality (+potential/actual longevity, survivorship curves), dispersal and recruitment. Definitions and examples of basic terms are provided.

2. Population regulation

  • Density dependent and density independent factors are defined and characterized from the point of view of populations and ecosystems that they influence.

3. Sex Ratios

  • Classification (Mayr): primary, secondary, tertiary sex ratio.
  • A difference between bird and mammal patterns is noted, as well as evolution according to age. Examples of sex ratio in birds vs. mammals and ungulates are given.
  • Explanation of skewed ratios:
    • Hypothesis I. The “chromosome” hypothesis
    • Hypothesis II. Density-independent mortality (predation, physiological stress) hypothesis
    • Hypothesis III. Intraspecific competition hypothesis
  • Linking natality to sex ratio: how dominance affects different species’ sex ratios

4. “Population density affects sex ratios in red deer”

  • Summary, including Hypothesis, Results, Discussion
  • Extensive presentation of the paper, emphasizing on observations and discussion
  • Key points:
    • Dominant females are more likely to produce male offspring than subordinate females.
    • Offspring sex ratio was associated with dominance at low but not at high density.
    • The sex ratio at birth was also correlated with the amount of rainfall between November and January
    • Female fecundity also decreased with rising population density.
    • Fecundity increased significantly with dominance ranking.
    • Corpus luteum function is affected by social status in red deer.
    • The correlation between November–January rainfall and annual birth sex ratio was presumably generated by post-implantation fetal mortality.
    • Resorption of male fetuses => mothers that are unable to invest enough resources to provide them with a reasonable chance of breeding successfully.
    • High mortality of male fetuses may be a by-product of faster male growth rates.

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