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Archive for the ‘It’s a Vet Life’ Category

It often happens that your dart syringe gets lost or destroyed, like in the case of darting monkeys when they just take it from their buts and dismissively destroy 10 dollars of equipment it in your face. And, in my case I have never used less that 4 shots on a macaque to hit him good. In this case you definitely cannot afford around 50 dollars only to immobilize an animal. So you have to find other cheep ways to stay in business of  treating wild-animals. So, here is how you can make your own dart syringe and needle  from two 3 ml normal Luer lock syringes and 18 G needles , that will cost you a couple of cents.

Dart destroyed by macaque

Dart destroyed by macaque

Homemade dart syringes  and the material required

Homemade dart syringes and the material required

Ovidiu Rosu

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Your parents found you spending hours and hours watching Animal Planet, Discovery Channel or reading old National Geographic magazines and you would not wear anything without a tiger or o vulture printed on it? Your favorite place in the world was the little zoo of your city where you knew every animal by it’s given name and its species in tree different languages including Latin, before you really were able to write your name properly? Your all-time heroes were Jeff Corwin, Mark O’Shea and Steve Irwin to whom you’ve sent mails telling how big fan you are, but they somehow never replayed? You’ve been bouldering for a couple of years now, you only buy your cloths from mountain shops, you are a survival techniques wannabe and all your weekends you try to spend them in the forest?


This is how you knew that your life must have to do something with wild animals, maybe even getting paid for it. Being a keeper was too big of an issue in your all university graduate family, a biologist you found it to be to much “bla-bla” about taxonomy and DNA stuff so the only thing left was the veterinary studies. (more…)

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When we think of conservation we automatically think of far away, exotic species standing on the brink of extinction, expecting our intervention. But we often forget to look in our own back yard. Even if Europe is nowadays a highly agglomerate, industrial, “developed” world, that has nothing to do with the remote or exotic flair of the Amazonian jungle or the wide African savannas, there are still patches of wilderness closer to us than we might expect.

The habitat of Europe’s iconic species was reduced over time to such an extent, that some of the countries completely excluded form their lives the simple idea of having wild animals among their settlements. The socio-economic landscape of Europe has been modified in the last two centuries so profoundly, that, for example, in Austria and Germany the people’s fear of being attacked on the ski slopes rejected any programs of reintroduction of the brown bear, or any other big carnivore whatsoever.Picture 058 (more…)

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Young female brown bear (Ursus arctos) , age approx 9-10 months was rescued from a touristic mountain area and arrived at the Orphan Bear Rehabilitation Center  from Harghita. The rescue party saw a laceration with purulent discharge on one of the thoracic limbs. They immediately consider to put a bandage with a medicinal plant estract (Euphorbia silvestris) and call for the assistance of a vet.IMG_4880

At the vet’s arrival, the bandage was  already ripped off by the bear and the laceration was easily seen.  Because of the aggressive nature of the cub and the stressful intervention, it was considered to  put the animal under anesthesia, and a proper inspection to be taken. (more…)

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Leipzig… a quiet little German town where campings are ridiculously expensive and young lads walk around in the middle of the night, day, morning, (or through the whole day for that matter) drinking their brains out on the streets. Yeah, I know, it was some sort of a holiday, but nevertheless, it was interesting to see so many totally wasted people on the streets.

For tight-student budget reasons we stayed in a camping, in tents. In times like these, you get to appreciate the quality of your tent and sleeping bags. After 4 nights in the tent, at 5ºC, you start to feel your true age.

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This happended last year, in May 2008, and since we are about to get on the road again, I thought it’s worth remembering:

Ovidiu was waiting for the EAZWV congress for month. He was almost too excited (even for him). I have to admit I wasn’t… Still under the influence of my “middle study crisis”, I guess… And the thought of spending 150 euros on 2 days and a half of boring lectures was quite appalling. But I’m glad I didn’t back out.

So the story begins…

We made the long journey to Leipzig with Ovidiu’s poor car. I’m saying “poor” because it was filled up to the extent that one more jar of pickles would’ve produced an implosion on it’s own weight. To cut the costs we decided to take two friends of Ovidiu’s who were trying to make a cheap, short holiday, so their luggage added up… so we had 5 huge rucksacks (5 because a lady always carries a bit more attire…), 1 huge paraglider (took up half the trunk), tons of food, 2 tents, sleeping bags, mum’s cookies, home made “pasca”, veggie “drob”, etc etc etc… You can imagine.

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THE VETS ARE OUT THERE

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